280gr wfn with titegroup or unique?

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todddoyka
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i have a 44 mag in a ruger sbh(4 5/8" barrel) and i've gotten 400+ boolits that are 280gr wfn gc. since i'm disabled(right leg/arm don't work) , i've found that i like the 250gr mihek hp under 7.0gr of unique and a 44 sp case. i don't do much 44 mag, but i figure that i have to use a 44 mag. (just me, but a 44sp goes 250gr, 265gr it might go). does anyone have a titegroup load i could use for 280gr boolit? or would i be be better off using a unique load(i have that)?
 my range will be 25 yards, i'm using for targets, soda cans,.... it might  be used for deer(25 yards and under). 

Chris3755
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Not Sure
Mak
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44 Magnum

There are a few schools of thought on this one.
First off, if you're looking for a fun target or plinking load, it doesn't make much sense to load a 280grWFN. That is a high performance pill designed for full velocity loads. Squib loads won't deliver accuracy, and might not stabilize that bullet.
Now there is a school of thought that promotes shooting short brass in full length cylinders, 38s in 357, 45 Colt in 454s,  44special in 44mag. I don't follow that thought, because I find the best accuracy is found in developing the load with the correct length of brass.
If you must shoot the special in the Magnum, then stick with the 250gr load. It will handle anything you could reasonably ask.

admin
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Ditto

Although I often shoot specials in my magnum cylinders, I agree it is probably not best practice. A higher velocity/ lower weight combo will probably deliver better/ more consistent accuracy, although I get acceptable accuracy and low recoil with a 240 gr cast at 700 fps in my IPSC loads (0 to 35 yard targets typically)  Good idea to really clean the build up in the cylinder that occurs in the 1/10th of an inch right in front of the case mouth before you (or any one else) run any magnums through it. 

admin
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On that subject...

I'm looking for a reduced recoil magnum load that would have a very tight velocity deviation so it would group the pills out a couple hundred yards.  While the above mentioned specials will consistently take out  6" plates at 30 yards, the are all over the hillside at 200...

Mak
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Tough choices

Al, the kicker there is looking for 200 yard accuracy with reduced velocity.
I know it's a completely different game, BPCR, but these guys are getting 300 yard accuracy with moderate velocity and exceptionally long, heavy bullets. 
Light for caliber bullets slightly undersized were championed by Lee Jurras in his ammunition line, and maybe 10 years ago he was deep into long range shooting, but I don't think the two are compatible. Unfortunately, I've lost track of Mr Jurras, but he really knew his way around powders and bullets.
Pretty much, the conventional thinking goes that for long range, velocity is king. From here, you have to find the design that stabilizes at very low velocity. Yes, because the bullet is going to shed significant velocity by the time 200 yards is reached. This usually means a bullet weight heavy for caliber, and as long as possible, with the proviso that it must stabilize. Nothing here is going to provide low recoil.
I don't know one honest man who really enjoys recoil, and says so. I know I don't enjoy throbbing joints and stretched tendons, but it's going to take some recoil to get where you want to go. Newton's physics, you know.
Keep us posted on your efforts.

admin
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velocity vs weight

Hi Mak
I usually keep with 240 - 250 Keiths, chrono a little over 1300 fps, plenty of recoil in ruger blackhawk and s&w 629.  Tried my first few batches of reduced loads Saturday, best 2 loads were  929.3 to 939.1 over 6 rounds, stepped the load up a grain and had a 1022 to 1030, seems like good consistency over the chrony and good groups at the 50 yard range. Right in the middle of the loading data range for the powder/ bullet combo also. The 930's were comfortable, the 1030 weren't bad either but noticeably hotter. 
The slower loads 800 fps the deviation went way up, 1100+ fps good on the deviation but not feeling much difference then full blow.
Think I'll try to find some lighter bullets and shoot for around 1000-1100 and see what happens.

Mak
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Sounds good

Al, if you like where your best loads printing, you might try them at 100 yards and see what they can do. If you like that, then see if you can stretch it out further. You will find the maximum range, which might not be the same as your desired one.
It occurred to me that Mr. Keith said more than once that long distance accuracy was the test for a good sixgun, and it separated the good ones from the rest. He was a compulsive gun buyer, so I'm certain he was speaking from experience. This is a long way of saying that you should try your best loads in different guns, because some guns just do shoot better.
I'd be interested to know what you get from light pills. The Super Vel loads from Mr. Jurras shot full jacketed, slightly undersized bullets that were also light for caliber. This was before jhp was the norm, and he did so well that the brass supply he depended on mysteriously dried up. Those loads were fast, but I'm not aware of any attempt at discovering their long range accuracy.
I've been told some of these newer Blackhawks can really shoot. I don't have one, but maybe you do. At the very least, you'll have fun finding out. I can almost smell the powder from here...